Which hats don’t you like wearing?

A few questions that may help

Small business owners wear many hats. It’s out of necessity, simply because there are so many things that need doing within a small business. The problem is that when you get busy, there sometimes isn’t time for everything to do all the jobs that need doing. Sometimes these jobs can be simply delayed a little, but what if you go through a busy patch that lasts for a while?

The question is: How do you prioritise the hats? Which hats must you continue to wear and which could you really benefit from by getting some assistance?

My thoughts: the answers to these questions will guide you to which to outsource:

Which hats don’t you like wearing?

Which ones do you lack skills around?

For most people, that will start with those involving complex legislation. For anything that needs a lawyer, you need to get help unless you are suitably qualified. For HR problems, the legislation changes so frequently, it is wise to get at least some advice and accountancy can get complex, depending upon the tax situation.

After this, there is another set that can be outsourced if you are simply too busy. For them, there is one more question to ask yourself?  What is the opportunity if you outsource?

If you can earn more by simply freeing up your time, it makes sense to outsource what you can.

If the service provider has better skills and will deliver an enhanced ROI, it makes sense to use the service provider.

You do what you do because you love doing it and it provides you and your team with job satisfaction, a lot of fun and a lifestyle you want, so why let things get in the way of doing what you love doing?

I hope this helps.

Use your marketing data wisely

We’d like to say a huge thank you for joining us at the IoT Tech Expo Europe!

This was the opening line to an email I received last week.  That’s very nice of them, you might think, but there is a problem with this… I wasn’t there.

Don’t get me wrong. I did intend to go and I did register, but I never got the time to attend, as it was one of those “I’d love to have a nose around” events.

Up until then, the marketing team had done everything right:

  • I’d been thanked for registering
  • They sent me a link to get my delegate e-badge
  • They kept me up to date with what was happening

As you cannot get in, and sometimes even out, of these events without having your e-badge scanned, there’s no excuse for not knowing whether I was at the show. It goes without saying that these emails were written before the event even took place, but I can only assume they didn’t add attendance data to their automation tool, but they had a week to do it.

The lesson: don’t try to do things your data doesn’t support

My Tips:

  • Draft your emails well before the event, so you have time to make any adjustments you need to.
  • Personalise them based only on the data you have or are going to collect.
  • Manage your data and make sure the data is added to the relevant tools.
  • Keep it simple the first time. Better to deliver a simple message well than a complicated one poorly.

I hope this helps.