9 ways your best client can help you win more business

There are many ways your best client can help you win more business.

Our last blog talked about using them to develop an avatar and the key messages that form the core of your marketing communications. Let’s look at just how many different ways your best client can help.

1. Developing your Ideal Client

We covered this in the last article, but it makes absolute sense that you want more clients just like your best one(s). Why wouldn’t you.

2. Developing your Messaging

Again we’re nicking the kudos of the last blog, but it’s still valid.

3. Referrals

Let’s get the obvious ones out of the way first shall we! Whether they give you referrals because you ask them to, or completely off their own back, you want them to give you referrals. It shows they trust you and believe in you.

4. Testimonials

The words they provide are hugely powerful. We all buy online and we’re influenced by the reviews provided by others who have bought that product. As your best client has been using your services for some time, they will be respected by their peers and will support your sales efforts.

5. Case Studies

Potentially even more powerful, assuming you include the results you deliver rather than just what you did. People who read the case study will be looking to understand what your best clients gets in return for using your services. They’re not as interested in what you did and what happened. For a complete guide on what makes the best case studies, click here.

6. References

Do you ever offer a prospective client the opportunity to talk to your clients? In the same way you look for references when employing a member of staff, prospects often look for the same. Of course, testimonials and case studies can provide an alternative, but some still want to talk to a real human being. Who better to give them to talk to?

7. Feedback

If you’re thinking of adding services or changing something, running past your best client is a good idea. Depending on why you are making changes, getting their opinion on whether the changes are positive, or not, is really useful feedback. If, as your best client, they wouldn’t buy the changed product or service, should you be trying to make the changes?

Of course, a sample of one is never a good idea, but it’s definitely a starting point.

There are other ways your best client can help you. It doesn’t just have to be about winning new business.

8. Recruitment

We’re not suggesting you steal their staff – that’s not a good idea. However they may know people who can fill your vacancies. Keep them up to date with the people you are looking for.  You never know.

9. New Suppliers

If your business is a similar size or has similar needs to your best client, why not ask them who they use? Perhaps your office cleaners aren’t very good or you’re looking for new office furniture. Who did they use and would they recommend them? By asking them, you’re showing you respect their opinion and you trust them too.

I hope this helps

Who’s your best client?

As a director of a small business, you want to sell to as many people as possible. By doing that, you grow the business and you, hopefully, increase your profits. So why am I suggesting you think about just one person: your best client?

Thinking about one person is far easier than 1000s

Who’s the One Person you know most about?

Who is the person you know most about? Your Best Friend. Who is your best friend? How well can you describe him or her? I would hope that, considering they are your best friend, you can describe them in detail. What they look like, their preferences, their job, where they live, their political affiliations and much more.
Talking to your best friend is easy isn’t it. You talk about the hobbies you share. Other friends you share are prime targets to talk about (you know you do, even if you won’t admit it). You share your opinions of what is happening in the news – and you know what their reply is likely to be. It’s simply because you know them in detail.

Everyone at the Gym

There are 100s of members at your gym, your golf club or the pub. You’ve probably met a lot of them and so can recognise them, at least facially if not by name. But do you know as much about each of them as you do about your best friend?
It’s the same when thinking about your strategic marketing planning.

Think about your Best Client

Who is your best client? Be careful when you think about your best client. They may, or may not, be the company that spends the most money with you. Without doubt, they should be the company that generates profit.
They are, most likely, a company you’ve been working with for some time and you want to work with for a long time to come. What would your business be like if you had a lot more clients like this one?

Thinking about everyone is far harder than thinking about one specific company and one person in that company.

They have similar attributes

Your Friends

Your best friend has that privileged position because you have a lot in common. The chances are, your friends are the same: you have a lot in common.
At the gym, you won’t know them as well as your friends, but you will be able to imagine what they have in common:

  • They all want to improve their fitness levels.
  • Many of them will be looking to lose weight and/or get that beach body, in readiness for the summer.
  • You know that they have some disposable income – gym fees are rarely low.

Again, it’s the same thing when you’re planning your marketing
They will be in an industry sector you know and understand. Their office is likely to be relatively close to yours and they will spend sufficient money with you so that they are interesting and profitable. What’s the decision maker’s job title? Is that the same, or similar, to decision makers in other clients.
For the purposes of this article, let’s assume that you’ve described your best client as:

• Architects in London, with the Senior Partner as the decision maker. LinkedIn lists 50 people with that description.

Already your target audience has grown from one person to 50. If you tweaked your description to say the whole of the UK , the number increase to 123. Some Senior Partners will call themselves the Founder. Your audience has now increased, purely on LinkedIn, to 3,518.

You can see descriptions of our Ideal Client here, if you would like some guidance on how to describe them.

How many of your other clients are like this client?

They will have similar issues

Let’s leave the personal analogy aside from now on. But think about the issues your Ideal Client has. The issues they have will be the same, or very similar to issues experienced by other companies of the same attributes.
What are their Issues?
What do you help them with? How often do you help them? How do you help them?

Everything you list here is highly likely to be relevant to the 3,518 Senior Partners or Founders we identified earlier. By simply thinking about your best client, you’re now identified the issues and the ways you can help 1,000s of potential clients.

They will all want a solution

Getting your Ideal Client focus rightYour best client is one that will be very happy with the work you’ve done for them. The question we’re asking you is: What does a successful piece of work look like?
When you then talk to your target audience about the successes you achieve, they will like what they hear. They will recognise how you talk about the type of client you work with and the issues you help them resolve. Recognition is easy because they are similar companies, with similar issues. They will listen to how you will resolve the issues, but that isn’t the important bit. What they really want is the results – the success – you describe. Why wouldn’t they?

So hopefully this article has described the process of how thinking about just one person will help you develop a set of key messages that will engage a target audience and generate the leads you want to grow your business.

If you have any questions or would like some assistance, give us a call on 020 8634 5911. Talk to you soon.