Category

A Helping Hand

A Helping Hand is a category aimed at doing just that – giving small business owners a helping hand in improving their marketing performance.

Blogs written by a small business marketing consultant that will help small businesses grow.

These blogs normally look at one of two things:

  1. how you can improve an aspect of your small business marketing
  2. how you can stop making a mistake with your small business marketing

If you need further assistance with any aspect of your marketing, simply call us on 020 8634 5911

image to support article: focus your marketing

Why you have to focus your marketing

By A Helping Hand, Customer Understanding, Marketing Performance

focus your marketing

Four key reasons to focus your marketing

There are many business owners out there who believe they can sell their product/service to anyone – sand to the Arabs and all that. I’ve no doubt they are very good sales people and could sell to anyone they sit in front of.  It doesn’t mean they should be trying to sell to anyone. I believe that you have to focus your marketing and let me explain my reasoning. Read More

appropriate clothing

Nine questions to choose the right marketing channels for your business

By A Helping Hand, Marketing Performance

appropriate clothing

What are the right marketing channels for your business?

As the Norwegians are famous for saying, there’s no  such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing. It’s the same for your marketing. There are lots of different ways to market your business and its up to you to choose the right marketing for your business. So where do you begin? Read More

6 reasons why you should stop doing social media

By A Helping Hand, Customer Understanding, Marketing Performance

Social media: love it or hate it, it has become part of our lives, both professionally and socially. Even if you aren’t using it, I bet your friends and acquaintances are and they are bugging you to use it as well.

For this article, let’s put aside personal use and look at whether you should stop using social media professionally.

Consistency is king

Your followers and connections are a fickle lot. They will love much of what you post and then Share/Comment/Like/Retweet, right up until the point they forget about you.

Why will they forget? If you aren’t appearing on a regular basis. We all have so many messages chucked at us on a daily basis, including lots more connections and followers on social media, it is easy to forget someone and lose track of what is happening.

If you’re just Shouting

Social media is called social media for a reason. If you want it to work for your business, you need to be sociable. If all you are interested in doing is posting your latest special offer, you are going to be wasting your time. If this is you, you really should stop using social media.

You’re just being negative

If all you do is criticise others, particularly without offering a solution, you’ll quickly get a reputation. Check out some of our MPs to see what I mean. Nobody likes to be criticised, especially if you are just being negative and not suggesting an improvement.

You’re not there at all

Not being there at all is even worse than being inconsistent. This is particularly relevant when you consider the activity of prospective clients or staff.  Almost without fail, the first thing someone does when they hear about you is check your online presence. They find your website and then follow that with your social media presence. If your Twitter/LinkedIn/Facebook accounts haven’t done anything for 6 months, what are they going to think?

You’re better off shutting down your account than having one that hasn’t been used for some time.

No traffic being generated

Your social media activity is, presumably, being done to generate new clients. If not, I am wondering why you are spending valuable time on there. The question is: how much website traffic are you getting from your social media activity?

If you don’t know, I refer you to our previous blog about Google Analytics and then recommend you see how much traffic you are getting.

If you aren’t getting any traffic, there are three probable reasons:

  1. You aren’t saying anything worthwhile (see point two above)
  2. You forgot to put any links to your site on your profile or in your posts (has been known)
  3. Nobody who is likely to buy from you uses that social media platform (see next point)

Any of these are bad and you need to identify which one is causing the issues and fix it fast.

If you disagree, I have a challenge for you: nip down to your local bank and try and pay your mortgage with Likes!

Your Target Audience doesn’t use it

Are you using the social media platforms you do because you use them in your personal life and so know what to do (?!?!) or is there another reason?

Have you considered which platforms are the ones your target audience is most likely to be using? Let me give you some examples:

  • If you sell to Managing Directors of technology businesses, they are highly unlikely to be on Facebook (at least in a business mood) so activity on there would be a waste of time. Moving to LinkedIn (18,366 in the UK alone, plus another 8,648 CEOs) would be a far better option.
  • Launching a new restaurant in St Albans via LinkedIn may not be the best idea (although there are 84,394 people from St Albans on LinkedIn, including 1 food critic). Adding great images of the food and the restaurant on Instagram and/or Facebook may be more effective as people are thinking more about their leisure time

Signing Off?

Do any of the above resonate with you?  If they do, you need to carefully consider whether you should stop using social media for your business. After all, your time is precious and you need to maximise your use of that time to generate leads for your business in order to grow.

I hope this helps

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7 ways Google Analytics can help your small business

By A Helping Hand, Technology & your business

Google Analytics is a godsend for all small businesses. But, so many either don’t know it exists or don’t use it.

In January I delivered a marketing workshop to about 60 small business owners. Less than half of them put their hands up, when asked if they had Google Analytics on their website.

Let’s spend just a few minutes looking at why we believe EVERY small business with a website should have Google Analytics installed and what you can learn from it.

Read More

dump em - the prospects not engaging with your marketing

Dump those who aren’t engaging with your marketing

By A Helping Hand, Customer Understanding, Marketing Performance

dump em - the prospects not engaging with your marketingAs a business owner, you want people engaging with your marketing.

That means it grabs the attention of your target audience, it educates them on why they should use your product/services and they jump willingly into your sales pipeline as a new lead. Marketing engagement is key.

If people aren’t engaging with your marketing you have two choices:

  1. Continue trying to engage them
  2. Dump ‘em

Let’s look at the options.

Continue trying to engage

People who really aren’t responding to your marketing are sending you a message: they’re not interested! If they really aren’t opening any of your emails, responding to your social media activity or even taking your calls, you have to consider whether this is a good use of your time. If they were interested, they would be interacting at least some of the time.

  • They are consuming your mental energy because you believe there is still an opportunity for a sale with at least some of them.
  • You spend time liking, retweeting and responding to social media posts. Time that is a scarce resource.
  • Keeping them on your mailing lists impacts your marketing stats, making open/clickthrough rates lower than they should be.

Dump ‘Em

If you simply remove them from your mailing lists (what member rating do they have in MailChimp?) and stop engaging with their social media, you have that most precious resource to invest in those who are engaging.

Those who are engaging with you want to know more. They want you to talk to them and they are far more likely to buy from you.

The consequences

Let’s think about all of this:

Who would you rather invest your time in? Those who are engaged are likely to buy from you and your time is far better spent on them. Which is a safer bet: 3:1 or 50:1?

There is a slim chance that those who aren’t currently engaged will come back to you. It may be that they aren’t ready to buy from you just yet. I know I’ve suggested you take them off your mailing list (GDPR and all that), but that doesn’t mean you have to cut all ties. You may still be following them on Twitter and you may still be connected on LinkedIn. What’s more, by giving your time and mental effort to those more engaged, you ensure your business is still around when others return.

‘Tis the season for a new marketing strategy

By A Helping Hand, Strategic Planning

In the next couple of weeks, Christmas trees will begin to pop up in shopping centres, lights will appear in the streets and the radios will begin playing carols on repeat. It can only mean one thing.  Christmas is coming.

The question is: do you need to change your marketing to fit the festive season? Is there any way you could use the Christmas period to your advantage?

If the answer is yes, the trick is to start planning early. As Halloween ends, the shops waste no time in getting their decorations up. It may still be a few weeks away, but it’s now considered the run up to Christmas. So, embrace the season and find out how you can create an effective Christmas marketing campaign.

Read More

marketing budget

How much should you spend on marketing?

By A Helping Hand, Marketing Performance

marketing budgetHow much should you spend on marketing is a question I get asked a lot.

Let me see if I can answer it.

There are companies who spend a huge amount on marketing. Red Bull is, perhaps, the most famous of these. The costs of running an F1 team, an international go-kart series and sponsor huge numbers of adventure junkies doesn’t come cheap. The last figure I saw was 38% of revenue.

At the other end, there are companies who spend almost nothing. If they can get all the leads they need through word of mouth, I wish them all the best.

So let’s return to the question. Seeing as I am a consultant, let’s start the answer by asking you a question – or three.

Read More

Don’t stop Marketing for the summer

By A Helping Hand, Customer Understanding

Have you stopped marketing over the summer?

  1. Everyone’s away for the summer.
  2. Nobody makes any decisions over the summer
  3. There’s no point in doing any marketing over the summer

Every year I hear the same old reasons for not doing any marketing over the summer. Let’s have a look at this in more detail and see whether there is any benefit in not doing any marketing over the summer…

Read More

The 10 rules of Negotiation

By A Helping Hand

The 10 Rules of Negotiating

As this month’s topic is how marketing can help Sales to deliver more deals, I thought I would use a video I’ve seen recently. It looks at negotiating and some key rules around negotiating when dealing with a prospect. As a small business marketing consultancy, we are firm believers that marketing and sales have to work together. Marketing continues after Sales begins and continues even after the sale.  Let us know what you think about this video.

Alan McCarthy’s 10 Rules of Negotiation look at what you should and shouldn’t do. Read More

image of Case Study Ninja logo

Marketing Planning – a case study

By A Helping Hand, Marketing Performance

This month’s blogs have all been around planning your marketing.  Obviously I’m going to say marketing planning is essential, but let me give you an example of what can happen when you do.

Case Study Ninja started in 2016 and I met Sarah, the founder, at a Croydon Tech City event.  For those of you who know Croydon (not the Kate Moss and Tiger Tiger version), you know if has a rapidly growing tech scene and is one of the fastest growing economies in the country. Croydon Tech City hold regular events aimed at new tech entrepreneurs, to help them launch and grow their business ideas.

As you must when networking, Sarah and I followed up our brief chat and business card swap with a further conversation.  I found out that she’d already been talking to other marketing agencies, but I still had an opportunity to pitch. Thankfully I won the work and we set about planning how to take Case Study Ninja to the world.

Who

We brainstormed who to target, why that person and the pains, needs and issues they had.  We matched how Case Study Ninja helps them to their needs and finally looked at the what would stop them buying.

How

The second session looked at what channels and how we would take Case Study Ninja to market. Of course, we considered what social media channels to use, but also what other online, and offline, channels would be used.

The Result

Case study Ninja now has over 70 clients and is thriving.  More detail can be seen in our case study here, but I recommend you also check out their website. If you use case studies as key evidence to help you win new clients, you should seriously consider using them.

Planning your marketing isn’t something you can leave to your marketing consultant. You must be directly involved, for a number of reasons:

  1. You know your business better than your marketing consultant will. Your input is vital.
  2. How will your consultant know what skills you have within the business, and what needs to be found?
  3. Have you been truthful about the budget you have available and what could impact that budget? If not, how can your marketing consultant know what is going to happen?
  4. Finally, you get more from your marketing being a success than anyone. It’s in your interests to be involved.

I hope this helps

social media likes

Likes don’t pay the bills – a targeting case study

By A Helping Hand, Customer Understanding

social media likesSocial media is a wonderful thing. Used well, it will drive brand awareness, maintain connections with your stakeholders and generate leads. But used poorly, it can chew up your time for very little return.

As you will see every 4th week, going forward from here, we will be using a case study to demonstrate what our blogs have been discussing for the previous three weeks.

An e-commerce company I have worked with has been using social media as part of its marketing mix for several years now. They would run competitions monthly to engage their followers and encourage them to interact and increase the reach of their brand. It seemed to be working too. The number of Likes continued to increase.

However, there was a problem. Our research showed that their typical buyer was a middle-aged man. This man lived in a suburban or rural location with a fairly big house and garden.  With an average unit sales value of around £300, the buyers needed to be fairly affluent.

When we ran the same research within their social media audience, the results were somewhat different. Middle aged women in urban locations were entering the competitions to win prizes that they would rarely use.

The audience they were attracting on social media was not there to get to know the brand, to flow through to their website and buy from them. They were simply there to win the prizes.

So what does this say about their social media?

They are attracting the wrong people!

But they have 1000’s of Likes and Follows I hear you say. The problem is that they aren’t getting what they really want: sales.

There is little point in spending time and money running social media campaigns that attract the wrong people.

The solution:

  • Post content that will attract their target audience.
  • Perhaps run Q&A sessions around what they sell to help people use their purchases more effectively.
  • Encourage customers to follow them on social media and post comments/images of their purchases in action.

What they need is their customers’ peers to engage on social media, so that they are tempted into buying. I’m not saying this is easy, but it’s got to be better than wasting money giving away stuff that isn’t encouraging others to buy.

I hope this helps

 

Moving from Ideal Client to Target Audience

From Ideal Client to Target Audience

By A Helping Hand, Customer Understanding

Moving from Ideal Client to Target Audience

Last week’s blog defined an Ideal Client and the fact that having a solid definition of who (it is always a who) is your Ideal Client helps you to focus your marketing and be more effective. Now let’s look at what happens when you market to this highly focused group.

Let’s define your target audience as HR Directors of UK companies in Information Technology.

Let’s imagine your service helps HR Directors to assess the skills and attitude of developers via an online portal. Although there are lots of developers out there, finding one with the right mix of skills is not easy. Your reason for targeting companies with HR Directors is purely size.  These companies probably recruit developers regularly as they look to grow their development team or simply replace those that leave.
LinkedInAccording to LinkedIn, there are currently 532 in the UK-based HR Directors of IT companies.

You have developed a series of key messages that talk of how you can help these HR Directors. You have a convincing set of evidence which proves you can walk the walk. Your marketing programme aims directly at these 532 (or more) HR Directors of UK-based IT companies.

Let’s now look at who else your key messages are likely to resonate with:

 

UK HR Directors

Depending upon just how your application is written, I am sure that every other HR Director in the country also worries about recruiting the right people with the right skills and attitude.

Maybe you’ve done some work for companies who aren’t in the IT sector and could use that evidence to talk to other HR Directors if they get in touch.

There are 4,066 HR Directors in the UK.

UK HR Managers

Companies that don’t put enough credence into the HR role may only have a HR Manager, or they may be a little smaller than your Ideal Client. They still have issues in recruiting good staff and your application may be able to help them.

There are 58,932 HR Managers in the UK

So far we haven’t even left the UK and the marketing programme you develop to focus on just 532 people may resonate with a further 63,000 people.

Your outbound marketing will be aimed specifically at your core audience, but the supporting content marketing and inbound activity is highly likely to generate 78 enquiries from within this audience of 63,000.

Would you turn them away?

Small Business Tips from the Golf Course

By A Helping Hand, Marketing Performance

As an an old cliche, many say that lots of business gets done on the golf course. If this was the case, I’d be playing much more, but here are a few business tips from the golf course that can help your business.

The Driving Range

The driving range is there for golfers to practice their game and to work out what needs to be done to improve. It’s also where they will warm up and get prepared for their game.

In business, as in golf and every other sport, you need to be prepared. You cannot simply go out and do stuff and expect your business to improve. You need to get prepared. You need to identify what isn’t working and then develop a plan.

Which Club?

Are you using the right tools? Many golfers, when trying to get their ball to the target (the green and the hole) will take Driver every time. After all, if they can get the ball as close as possible to the green, there is a better chance of getting a birdie (a good score), isn’t there.

Professional golfers, on the other hand, are more likely to take a shorter club and then another one they can fit well and increase their chances of the birdie. The shorter club increases their chances of staying out of the rough (not good).

Are you using the right marketing tools to reach your target audience? Just because everyone else uses Facebook (for example) doesn’t mean you have to if it won’t get your key messages in front of your target audience.

In the Rough

Using the wrong club often means you end up in the wrong position for your next shot. That usually menas the rough – or worse, the trees. Even if you have a good line to the green, the shot becomes harder and you’re much more likely to score a bogey (bad) or worse. All you can do is take your medicine and try not to do it again.

In any small business, you’ll make mistakes. Sometimes you’ll try out marketing tools that don’t work for you. The trick is to learn from your mistakes and try not to make them again.

Your Scorecard

Every golfer has to keep a scorecard, showing the score achieved at each hole. Personally, I also keep track of where I hit my tee shot (did I hit the fairway?), the number of shots I took to get to the green, how many putts and whether I went into a bunker or incurred a penalty. I use Golfshot to track my performance on the golf course.

What are you using to record your marketing and business performance? Whether you invest in a CRM and marketing automation tools, or simply use Excel spreadsheets, make sure you are measuring your performance so you can use the information to improve.

A Caddie

Professional golfers use a caddie to help them. Not only does the caddie carry their bag, they will advise on club choice, on where to hit the ball to and how the weather will impact their strike. They act as dogsbody, psychologist and nutritionist (ensuring they eat and drink on the way around to maintain energy levels) to help the golfer make the best score they can and (hopefully) win the competition.  Without the caddie, the golfer’s chance of winning are slim. The caddies are generally on 10% of winnings.

Having support, specifically to fill the gaps in your knowledge or preferences, will help you improve your performance. Whilst you aren’t likely to be paying 10% of turnover, you should expect to pay for their expertise.

Those of you who know me will know I can go on about golf forever, but I’ll stop there. I hope these help.

Golfing Terminology:

  • Driver: big headed club which will generally hit it further than all other clubs in your bag
  • Par: the number of shots you are allowed on any specific hole.
  • Birdie: using one shot less than Par (good)
  • Bogey: using one shot more than Par (not so good)

We hope these business tips help.

The unmanaged mountain of opportunity

By A Helping Hand, Marketing Performance

Somewhere in your office is a big pile of opportunities.

It’s probably just by your monitor or it may be in a desk drawer. If you use hotdesk, it’s probably in your bag or it may even be a series of images in an app on your phone.

What I am talking about? that pile of business cards you’ve collected over the past few months and done little with.

Within this pile of business cards could be your next 5 clients. What is five new clients worth to your business? How do you make sure you don’t miss out?

Filter them

If you’re an avid networker, you’ll have a number of cards which were “forced” on you by the card collectors and distributors that inhabit every networking event. They have almost certainly added you to their mailing list, you’ll have unsubscribed and now forgotten what they do.  The B1N file is the best place for them.

Look for the ones that are most likely to be prospects or be able to introduce you to prospects.

Now add them to your database, but make it very easy for people to unsubscribe.

Segment them

Providing everyone with the same information will not help you. Dependent upon which tools you use, segment your contacts into different groups.

  • MailChimp: use data columns and segments or add them into different groups
  • For Infusionsoft, use Tags
  • For Hubspot, it’s Personas and Smart Lists

Every automated marketing tool will have its own set of tools that allow you to segment by geography, product sales, lead source,, industry sector and any number of personal criteria.

Talk to them

Finally, use the information to talk to them. Use the segmentation tools to ensure that the information you send them is relevant:

  • For clients: what other products can they buy from you?
  • For prospects: what evidence can you show them so they see you can help them with their needs? Are you running any offers to tempt them into buying?
  • For nurturing: do you have white papers or recorded webinars showing your knowledge and expertise?
  • For introducers: do they know what your Ideal Client looks like so they can introduce you?

The unmanaged mountain of business cards on your desk can deliver new business, but it takes some effort and it takes real consistency.

I hope this helps.

Be Honest

By A Helping Hand, Marketing Performance

…or your marketing will suffer!

During February our blogs were about your target audience, identifying them and about getting the right key messages in front of the decision makers.

For March we’re going to move onto developing the right marketing programme. Let’s start with a little housekeeping.

If you are going to get the right marketing programme that then delivers the leads you want, you need to be honest.

Time

We’ve discussed in the past about the amount of time you have available for marketing your business. You know you have to do it, but what time is available within the business to do it properly.  If you are tight on resources, be honest about it. If you say you can do much more than you really have time for, your marketing (and its performance) will suffer.

Skills

Everyone can do social media can’t they! Some people struggle to admit they cannot do something because they believe they should be able to do it. Social media is a prime example of this, but there is a big difference in being able to use Facebook to keep up with your mates’ habits, and generating awareness, interest and engagement with your target audience.

If you have the time to learn, all is good, but that may not be the best use of your time so think carefully about the skills you have and the skills you need. Engaging with your target audience on Twitter and LinkedIn can be lots of fun, but your role as the business leader may mean you should leave this to someone else, whether within your business or externally.

Budget

To generate and deliver a consistent marketing programme, you need to invest. The investment needs to be over a period of time and so there is no point in starting a programme that you aren’t sure you will have the money available to complete. It will be better to start on a small budget and then build up as the returns are developed, rather than start high and have to try and cuts corners when there is less money about.

Your marketing budget needs to be a combination of time, cash and skills. Your honesty when developing your marketing programme will help to manage expectations but also deliver a better return on investment.

 

I hope this helps.

5 Things the political parties are promising us small business owners

By A Helping Hand

Enterprise Nation’s small business debate on March 2nd was an interesting event. Although the questions were given to the politicians beforehand – open questions would have been much more fun – and so they had time to prepare, some of the responses seemed ill-thought out.

Let’s have a look at what they political parties taking part (the Conservatives, Labour, the Liberal Democrats and the Green Party – UKIP decided not to show up) are promising us, as small business owners:

Business Rates

All parties agree that the current setup is simply too expensive. The Conservatives are reviewing the arrangements and, from next month, the retail discount is being reduced by a further £500 a year. Labour promises to cut these rates by £1 billion, but this money is coming from not cutting Corporation Tax.

The LibDems are scrapping Business Rates and replacing them with a Land Value Tax, based on the value of the land rather than the building value. The Greens are agreeing with them.

Childcare

A question about how female entrepreneurism is being limited by the cost of childcare raised some tensions. The question was aimed at getting a commitment to capping childcare costs and nobody would do this – market forces!

Labour’s commitment is to have all primary schools open from 8am to 6pm, thereby freeing up many mothers to be able to work “normal” business hours, with an additional 10 hours of free childcare for 3 & 4 year olds. The Lib Dems plan to extend the current 15 hours of free childcare, for 3 & 4 year olds, to two-year olds as well.

Manufacturing Support

There seemed to be little real response to this, with Labour looking to encourage more interaction between industry and higher/further education to ensure the skills they want are being delivered. Apparently there is too many courses for what people want to learn, rather than what industry wants.

Export Support

I spent too much time chuckling at the Greens’ comments, about the same apples being imported from The Netherlands and also being exported to The Netherlands, to note much on this bit – sorry!

Enterprise Investment Scheme

EIS and SEIS (Seed Enterprise Investment Scheme) were both heavily praised by all parties with nobody wanting to make any changes. The Conservatives commented about the level of investment available being capped by the EU and Labour want to encourage alternative business lending to provide real competition to the banks, thereby getting them to lend more.

 

To be honest, there was a lot of hot air flying about, with the expected cat fights on occasions, as they competed. I would have preferred much more open questioning, but I would not have wanted Emma’s job in managing this and controlling the tone.

What do you want from the next government?


what clients have bought which services

Marketing to the converted

By A Helping Hand, Marketing Performance

what clients have bought which services

Are you communicating effectively with those you know are highly likely to open your emails?

I am sure already know that it is far easier to sell to current clients than it is to new ones, but the key is knowing what to talk to them about.

Now I could then start discussing the quality of your account management and how will they know their clients,  what the plans each client had for the next two years and where they are in their planning, but I won’t. What I will say is how many of your clients know about everything you sell and how many of them buy everything you sell?

Without a good picture of who is buying what and who knows about what,  you cannot have a relevant conversation. If that conversation is irrelevant, it is highly unlikely to produce the result you are looking for.

Working all of this out is relatively easy but I must warn you,  it can lead to identification of issues, particularly within your billing.  Let me explain.

The easiest way to calculate who is buying what is via your invoicing.  Using this instead of trying to do it from memory ensures accuracy and shows you the true value of each relationship.  The problem comes when you see some of the, shall we say eccentricities that occur in your invoicing.  Terminology often varies dramatically,  as does categorisation and even values.  I’ve often found invoices where the decimal point is too far left, meaning you’ve missed out on £100 ‘ s (if not more).

This leads to a project of billing standardisation but that’s another blog altogether.

Once you have the list of who has bought what from you,  it’s much easier to then shape your marketing communications to ensure the right people know about the products or services.

Now all you need is a set of messages to send to the relevant people, so when you’re marketing to the converted, it works.

 

I want to talk to…

By A Helping Hand, Customer Understanding, Social Media

In the UK there are 689,890 companies[1], 190,978 of them meet the EU definition of an SME and so, theoretically, they could be my target market, bearing in mind my company name.

In reality the vast majority of them I will not be able to help. This is why you will rarely hear the word “anyone” uttered when I’m networking or asking clients for referrals. Why is it, therefore, that so many business owners believe they can sell their services to anyone?

The problem with anyone is that it is simply too wide a scope and what happens is that you end up with no-one being referred to you.

A chiropractor said to me, at a networking event recently, I can help anyone with a spine. Whilst this may be true, it doesn’t help me help them. I’m not going to mention them to everyone I know with a spine.

I need, and so will all your clients and connections, a little more to go on. Have you seen the latest eHarmony advert where they show a man on a couch with a camel? The advert goes on to say they were matched because of two matching criteria, but eHarmony uses more to ensure a good match.

You should use the same approach when asking for referrals. After all if 438 couples get married every day after being matched on eHarmony, they must be getting something right.

Whilst I am not suggesting you have 29 levels of compatibility with your clients, you must make it easier for people to refer you. Give them more information: industry sector, geography, company size, job title and, most definitely, reasons why.

The good thing about getting this pinned down is it also helps you work out what marketing to do, but I’ll talk about that next time!

 

[1] LinkedIn; as of 13/1/15