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How to Protect your Social Media from disgruntled employees

Social Media can do wonderful things for your brand image in a very short space of time. You are able to get your brand in front of the people you want to see it in a few short steps. but what happens if you have a team member leave; one who has admin access to your social media accounts?  If they left unhappy, there is a real risk that they will post content that can damage your brand. Here are our thoughts on how to protect your social media.

LinkedIn Company Page

When I first wrote on this topic, way back in 2011, your LinkedIn company page was far more open than it is now. You had what they called designated users. Almost anyone in the business could post on your Company Page. Thankfully now, only Admins can post. If one of your Admins leaves the business, simply go in and remove their access.

You may also want them to add an “until date” on their Experience section, so they are no longer listed as an employee. If they’re leaving under a cloud, good luck with that!

Hootsuite

This is a great tool for managing multiple social media accounts. But if you’ve locked this person out of your LinkedIn company page, but not from Hootsuite, they could still post to it. They can post to any account this is connected to. Delete them quick!

Twitter & Instagram

Twitter, and Instagram, are a little more complicated. This is simply because they don’t have users; the account has only one username and password. If you want to stop a disgruntled employee from using this, you have to change the password – and then get it to everyone else who has access.

Facebook

If you have set up your Business Page correctly, securing it is much the same as LinkedIn – remove their admin rights. If, however, you have set up a personal page for your business (instead of a Business Page), you’ve got the same issue as with Twitter.

Better safe than sorry

If you are unsure about what they have access to, you’re better off changing passwords on all your social media channels. Better safe than sorry. Others who need it will soon be in contact, and that gives you a chance to properly control who has access.

What if they post comments?

If you have locked them out, you’re safe from them posting unsuitable content, but you cannot stop them posting comments onto your posts, or mentioning your company on their own posts. Of course, you can appeal to their better nature and ask them to take posts and comments down. If they are libelous, you have more leverage (assuming you want to get solicitors involved). Deleting the post they commented on will remove their comments from that location, but not from their feeds.

In reality, very few people will post detrimental comments and you like to think that they will quickly become bored and move on to something else. If your HR department has a checklist for what needs to be done when someone leaves, willing or otherwise, ask them to add a social media box to the end of the list.

If you  want to talk about how to protect your social media and manage it more effectively, get in touch. We work with a wide range of marketing specialists, including social media. We’re only going to do good things with your social – it’s not worth our reputations not to!!!

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