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7 ways Google Analytics can help your small business

By A Helping Hand, Technology & your business

Google Analytics is a godsend for all small businesses. But, so many either don’t know it exists or don’t use it.

In January I delivered a marketing workshop to about 60 small business owners. Less than half of them put their hands up, when asked if they had Google Analytics on their website.

Let’s spend just a few minutes looking at why we believe EVERY small business with a website should have Google Analytics installed and what you can learn from it.

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Tracking isn’t just for rednecks

By Customer Understanding, Marketing Performance, Social Media, Technology & your business
  • A broken twig
  • fresh footprints
  • Frightened birds
  • Canddi return trigger!?!

All are signs a tracker will use when hunting their prey.  Knowing where their prey is through tracking is key for the hunter if they want to eat tonight.

The same goes for the your business (with the last one on the list only really for businesses).  Knowing who is looking at you and your online presence can really help you to grow your business. It’s key to be tracking your marketing

Let’s split this into two: you and your business.

Who’s looking at you?

As the owner or director of the business, you are a figurehead for the business.  People will look at you as an indicator of what the business is all about. There’s a few places people will go to in order to look at you:

LinkedIn

Both your personal and company profiles are likely to be looked at.  Are you happy they portray you well?  The good thing about LinkedIn is that you know who is looking at you and when they looked.  This means you can return the favour and then make a decision about what to do next.  Are they a potential client, a possible supplier or simply someone who could be a useful person to network with.

Twitter

To an extent, this depends on whether you tweet as you or as the business, but they’re still going to look. Keep it consistent and interesting. Most of all make sure you’re interacting.

Who’s looking at your business?

There are many tools you can use to check out your website’s performance, starting with good old Google.

Google Analytics

An oldy but a goody.  At the most basic level, you can see how many unique views you get, where they came from, how many pages are being looked at and what pages are liked/disliked (check out the bounce rate).  At the other end of the scale, you can see whether viewers are following the path you expect them to, what they are spending and what your demographics look like.

Check out Audience/technology/network as well.  You can see the names of some of the companies checking you out!

Canddi

No, I haven’t mis-spelt it, there are 2 d’s.  There are a number of more advance web analytics tools out there, including Trovus, Lead Forensics and IDFingerprint.  My favourite at the moment is Canddi.  Not only have they agreed to a free trial for all my clients, they won’t tie you in for a long-term contract and you can set it up to tell you when people return to your website.  Would you like the next conversation you have with a prospect to be timely and absolutely relevant?

I could go on forever about the various tools you can use to track who’s watching you online, but let’s save the 1984 bit for another time.   The simple truth of the matter is that keeping an eye on who is looking at you means you get a chance to interact with them, you know what they are interested in and you can have both a highly relevant conversation and one at the right time.

I wonder if your competition are doing the same thing?

Need a hand tracking your marketing performance? Call us on 020 8634 5911 or click here and we’ll call you.

 

 

Visitor Movement

By Customer Understanding, Marketing Performance

How are viewers moving around your website?

When you build your website, you think you have a logical path through the site. You want visitors to arrive, find what they want and then move to “Contact Us” so they can get in touch with you. Sometimes this isn’t the case and so you need to understand what paths are being taken so you can make changes to get your website visitors through your site.  This is where Google Analytics comes in.  The new version provides a tool called Visitor Flow.  this tool provides a graphic image of the routes through, and out, of your website that your visitors take.

If you’ve got a Google Analytics account, make sure you’re using the New Version. If you’re still on the Old Version, click on New Version just below the top right hand corner. Once you’ve clicked you will see a graphic representation of how your website visitors move through your website.  Starting from their country of origin. The image below shows that the majority of visitors come from the UK but go to a number of different pages.  The visitors from the USA, India, France and others all go to the Home Page.

image of Google Analytics visitor flow, supporting a small business marketing article for SME Needs Ltd

Let’s work our way across the image and explain what it is telling you and how this can help you to improve the performance of your website.

Starting Pages

Below Starting Pages it shows the number of visitors in the measured period (default is the last 30 days).  Next to that is the number of people who left without looking at another page (Bounced as it’s known). The thickness of each line represents the volume of visitors to each page so you can see 120 landed on the Home Page etc.

First Interaction

From each initial landing page you can then see lines moving to the right and joining up with another page name.  In our example 15 people went straight to Contact Details, 11 to the blog etc.  Of the 75 visitors who had that first interaction, 29 then left the website, leaving the rest to make a 2nd interaction.

Further Interactions

On your Google Analytics page you will be able to follow the image right for 12 interactions, giving you a detailed understanding of how visitors are using your website.

What does this all mean?

What does this all mean?  Simple; for your Marketing Director, or senior management, they can see where visitors go and, more importantly, don’t go. Are they following the path you want them to? If not where are they going? Are they clicking on the internal links you have on individual pages? If not, perhaps you need to make them more obvious or you need to improve the content

There is a great deal to be learnt from Google Analytics about the performance of your website and Visitor Flow is just one of the new features that I particularly like.  I hope you will find it useful too